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Henry Krumb Lecture Series  

 

SME helps bring outstanding speakers to the Local Sections through the Henry Krumb Lecture Series. The program is offered to all local SME sections to enhance their appreciation and understanding of important new methods and technologies. Lecturers are selected from the professionals who present technical papers at the SME annual meeting. The Series is administered by SME and is partially funded by a grant from the Seeley W. Mudd Memorial Fund.

 

Download guidelines for Lecture Series. (PDF)

 


2014-2015 Henry Krumb Lecturers:

Zachary Black

A Comparison of Traditional Geostatistical Estimation Methods to Implicit Modelling Methods

Abstract: This project demonstrates the application of a mine system simulation and animation model in enhancing the efficiency of a truck-shovel operation and reducing the haulage environmental impact in an open-cut coal mine. Mining engineers need to take into consideration many uncertainties when designing, operating, and managing a mine. Considering the magnitudes of capital and operating costs of mining equipment, simulating a proposed plan before it is implemented will lead to the better use of capital and operational budgets.

In any mine, a key objective is to have enough equipment for production and not have excess to where it is counterproductive. Due to the advent of responsible mining, environmental regulations, and eco-friendly practices, these factors must also be considered in the analysis. The over-trucked situation at a mine will be discussed, i.e. when the number of trucks exceeds the optimum number of trucks a mine should have for the most productive/profitable mining operation. When the system has an excess number of trucks, truck utilization is reduced which impacts mine operations, capital costs and the environment, through unnecessary truck purchases, energy use, air pollution etc. GPSS/H® and Proof Professional® were the software used for the mine simulation project.

Mr. Black is a Resource Geologist with 12 plus years of experience in geological exploration projects, consulting, database management, geotechnical engineering, project management and project engineering. He is a Society for Mining, Metallurgy & Exploration Registered Member and is recognized as a Competent Person for exploration and estimation according to the Canadian National Instrument 43-101 (NI 43-101). Mr. Black has participated in mineral resource projects at many levels of project development, from early exploration through bankable feasibility studies, and has assisted in the preparation of numerous NI 43-101 compliant technical reports. He has conducted site investigations, geologic field mapping and sampling, and data verification as an independent QP for a variety of gold, silver, and multiple commodity projects throughout the world.

 

 


 

 

Ebrahim Karimi-Tarshizi

Using a Discrete System Simulation and Animation Model of a Coal Mine to Increase Equipment Efficiency and Reduce Environmental Impact

Abstract: Resolution Copper Mining LLC is developing a new mining project to access approximately 1.6 billion known tons of porphyry copper resource 7000 feet below surface and mine it by block caving methods. This project will require approximately $5 billion to commence production in 2022 and take seven years to ramp up to full production of 120 thousand tonnes per day. This presentation discusses the project start up and the sinking of the first of six 7000 foot deep shafts required to access this world class orebody. Resolution's 28-foot diameter Number 10 shaft is currently 6000 feet deep and scheduled to reach full depth later in 2013. Resolution's sinking contractor, Cementation USA, uses state of the art conventional sinking methods combined with a largely local labor force to complete this record breaking shaft. Upon completion, Number 10 shaft will be the deepest shaft in the United States and the largest by volume in North America. Details of the methodology and lessons learned will be discussed in this presentation.

Tom Goodell is Resolution Copper's General Manager of Underground Development, responsible for directing all underground mining activities and shaft development work. Tom has more than 35 years of mining, engineering, project management, shaft construction and development experience. He has worked for leading national and international companies, including Redpath Corp., Battelle, Dravo Corporation and McIntosh Engineering. 
 

Ebrahim Karimi-Tarshizi is a PhD candidate in Geo-Engineering/Mining Engineering specializing in Mine Simulation and Animation at the Mackay School of Earth Sciences & Engineering at the University of Nevada, Reno (UNR). He will join Michigan Technological University (MTU) as an assistant professor of mining engineering in the spring of 2015. He received an MSc in Mining Engineering with a graduate minor in Business Administration from Mackay, and an M.B.A. from the UNR College of Business. He earned his bachelor’s degree in Mining-Exploration Engineering in 2004 in Iran. Prior to starting his graduate studies, Ebrahim worked for almost five years at various levels in the mining and petroleum industries. During his PhD research, he was employed part-time at Barrick Gold Corp – Cortez Hills surface operation to complete a mine simulation project. During his post-graduate studies in mining, he has focused on mine systems optimization using simulation and animation techniques. He has completed simulation projects of several mining operations in Europe and USA. Ebrahim has received several outstanding awards and honors from UNR and SME. He has also contributed to the SME technical programs by publishing several papers and chairing/co-chairing technical sessions on various aspects of mining. He is a member of the SME Young Leaders Committee and currently holds the position of Vice-chair of the Young Leaders Selection Sub-Committee.

 


 

 

Jessica Elzea Kogel 

Workforce Development Challenges - Managing Through Boom and Bust Cycles for the Long Term

Abstract: The global mining industry faces a number of emerging workforce trends some of which are related to management practices adopted in response to boom and bust cycles. Over the long term, these management practices have led to a smaller pool of qualified industry professionals. For example, a significant shortage of mining engineers and geologists is expected over the next 10 years. This shortage is due in part to the mining workforce reductions in the 1980s downturn. Another trend is that today’s workforce is increasingly dominated by younger, less experienced workers. A third is that the workforce is increasingly weighted towards contractors versus permanent employees. Industrial minerals companies are generally less sensitive to the boom and bust cycles that drive employment practices for much of the mining industry. However the sector is not entirely immune to them. Aggregates companies recently experienced significant layoffs due to the poor US economy. The industry recognizes the importance of investing in future workers and is adopting work force management strategies focused on developing a stable and well trained talent pool that can be sustained through industry downturns.

Jessica Elzea Kogel has more than 20-years of experience in the mining industry. She currently leads the geology and mining group for IMERYS’s North American kaolin operations and is responsible for exploration, mineral resource development, mine planning and reclamation. She has authored more than 30 peer reviewed papers, book chapters and field guides and holds four US patents. Kogel is past president of the Clay Minerals Society and served as the 2013 President of the Society for Mining, Metallurgy and Exploration. Jessica earned M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in geology from Indiana University after completing bachelor’s degrees in Earth Science and Paleontology at UC Berkeley. She is a certified professional geologist.

 


 

 

Hamid Maleki PHD, PE

Geotechnical Analysis of Mine Sesmicity and Control Measures in the Western US Mines

Abstract:  Mining in some of the western US coal mines including those in the Book Cliffs Coal Field of Utah has historically been associated with seismicity because of high-stress environments and the presence of stiff, competent rocks. To control seismicity, three practical approaches are used in both U.S. hard-rock and coal mines, most notably mine layout designs including the use of panel-barrier designs where caving is not favorable. The successful use of panel-barrier designs in a Book Cliff Mine 1 is analyzed here leading into the evaluation of optimal mine designs for another potential longwall mine located within close proximity of a regional reservoir. The specific objectives of this paper include a site-specific evaluation of (1) seismicity at the well-documented Mine 1 where panel-barrier designs were utilized together with comprehensive geotechnical monitoring and (2) improvements in mine layout design that would identify seismically less-active panel and barrier dimensions to be considered for mining near Mine 2 located near the reservoir.

Mining in some of the western US coal mines including those in the Book Cliffs Coal Field of Utah has historically been associated with seismicity because of high-stress environments and the presence of stiff, competent rocks. To control seismicity, three practical approaches are used in both U.S. hard-rock and coal mines, most notably mine layout designs including the use of panel-barrier designs where caving is not favorable. The successful use of panel-barrier designs in a Book Cliff Mine 1 is analyzed here leading into the evaluation of optimal mine designs for another potential longwall mine located within close proximity of a regional reservoir. The specific objectives of this paper include a site-specific evaluation of (1) seismicity at the well-documented Mine 1 where panel-barrier designs were utilized together with comprehensive geotechnical monitoring and (2) improvements in mine layout design that would identify seismically less-active panel and barrier dimensions to be considered for mining near Mine 2 located near the reservoir.

Model calibration was achieved by studying seismic events during extraction of two seams in the study Mine 1 using both side-by-side and panel-barrier designs. Based on similar simulations for geologic conditions of the study Mine 2 and available measurements in the study mines in Utah, the model shows a low degree of seismicity if an 800-ft-wide (245-m) face and 800-ft-wide (245-m) barrier are used in Mine 2. Similarly, low seismic risk is expected using another layout with a 730-ft face width (220-m) and 730-ft barrier pillar width.

Received graduate degrees from the Colorado School of Mines in 1981 specializing in applied rock mechanics. Took civil engineering and groundwater courses from Gonzaga University and Eastern Washington University during 1993-1994 while serving as the Technical advisor and PI for USBM Spokane Research Center. In addition I completed numerical modeling training using FLAC2D, 3D, PFC, Utah2 and plasticity. I have 30+ years of experience in applied ground control, stress analyses, mine design and geotechnical instrumentation in both soft and hard rocks.

 


 

 

Kal Sastry

Mineral Process Engineering Through 20th Century and Beyond

Abstract:  We begin this presentation with an overview of what constitutes mineral process engineering, then review its evolution through the early and later parts of 20th century to the present times. Subsequently we highlight the newer tools, technologies and a more tech savvy younger workforce that are being brought in this new millennium. At this point, we introduce a formal framework for mineral process engineering and illustrate it with a case study. Finally, we conclude the presentation by projecting the exciting opportunities provided by mineral process engineering during this rapidly changing technology century. This presentation will be made interactively enabling the audience to fully participate, comprehend and take away the exciting concepts of mineral process engineering and putting them into practice everyday.

Kal Sastry is a professor emeritus of metallurgy at the University of California Berkeley. His primary teaching and research interests are in the areas of pelletization, flotation, filtration and mathematical modeling and simulation of mineral processing operations. He published extensively on these topics and more specifically in the area of balling of iron ore concentrates. During the last twenty years, Kal has taken extensive interest in providing customized training for operators and engineers in the minerals industry.

Most recently, he is excited to introduce and propagate “mineral process engineering” as a formal field of learning and practice of mineral processing in the 21st century. Currently, he as a primary author working on a book entitled “Introduction to Mineral Process Engineering” to be used as a text for mineral processing undergraduate and graduate students as well as a reference book for practicing mineral process engineers.

Kal did his undergraduate studies in chemical engineering from India and doctoral work in mineral processing at the University of California Berkeley. He is a Distinguished Memebr of SME and the SME 2014/15 Henry Krumb Lecturer.

 


 

 

Steven Schafrik

Underground Coal Mine Tracking and Communication System Reliability and Availability Methodology

Abstract:  Every underground coal mine in the United States must deploy and operate a wireless communication as well as an electronic tracking system. This talk addresses the reliability and availability of an installed tracking system, and the communications infrastructure that supports it. We assume that the tracking system uses the communication system to perform its operation. A particular interest are the requirements for the systems to operate continuously without failure after a mine disaster for 24 hours, and the requirements in the MINER Act for the tracking systems to be “functional, reliable and calculated to be serviceable”, and the communications systems “redundancy”. These requirements imply a certain reliability and availability. This talk describes a quantitative way to assess these systems requirements using the tools that are available and commonly used by the Reliability, Maintainability, & Availability community. The methodology described can be applied to all aspects of mining systems that require an understanding of their reliability and availability.

Dr. Schafrik is a Research Assistant Professor at the Virginia Center for Coal and Energy Research (VCCER). He has been in this position since 2013 and has worked for the VCCER in numerous roles since 1997. He has a B.S. (1999), M.S. (2001) and Ph.D. (2013) in Mining and Minerals Engineering from Virginia Tech.

Dr. Schafrik is currently conducting research on wireless communication systems, ventilation systems and risk management. He is acknowledged for his ability to transfer technologies from other industries to mining. He has experience conducting and managing research for the Virginia Department of Mines, Minerals and Energy, the U.S. Department of Energy, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, the Office of Surface Mining, as well as for corporations and foundations.

These projects have involved a variety of academic departments, graduate students, undergraduate students, public institutions and private corporations. Dr. Schafrik is also involved in support activities for the VCCER, including the development of custom software and information systems support. Virginia Tech Intellectual Properties license several software applications developed by Dr. Schafrik. He frequently represents the VCCER at meetings and conferences as a committee member, author and speaker. Dr. Schafrik is also responsible for responding to requests from the public for energy data and mining information.

 


 

 

Gordon M. Stevens

Innovative Environmental and Management Education Programs that “Educate” Rather Than Just “Train” Employees Have Big Payoffs

Abstract:  In an era of aging workforces, shortages of qualified professionals, increases in environmental scrutiny and demands for sustainable development, it is imperative that industrial minerals, aggregate and related heavy construction companies develop innovative programs to educate their employees by providing them with the management skills and environmental awareness indispensable to financial and sustainable success of the company. This presentation will focus primarily on the efforts of OMG Midwest (an Oldcastle Company) to educate its employees to be better prepared as mangers and environmental stewards. The education programs used by OMG Midwest have a demonstrated track record of successfully cultivating management skills, boosting employee retention, fostering environmental awareness, increasing regulatory compliance, and financially improving the bottom line.

Gordon M. Stevens has over 35 years of experience in geologic and hydrogeologic investigations with nearly 30 years as a consultant for aggregates, silica sand and cement producers. He has a Masters Degree from the State University of New York at Oneonta and a Bachelors Degree from the State University of New York at Binghamton, both in Geology. He is a Licensed Professional Geologist in Illinois, Wisconsin and Indiana, and Certified Professional Geologist with the American Institute of Professional Geologists.

During the initial years working with the mining industry, Gordie focused on hydrogeologic impacts from existing or proposed mines. Over the years his focus has expanded to managing multidisciplinary teams of engineers and scientists through the design and permitting process for greenfield mine developments and expansions of existing facilities. His primary experience includes numerous mining operations, landfill and contaminated site characterizations, and water supply investigations. Gordie worked as a Site Development Specialist while serving in the U.S. Air Force.

Gordie is currently Chair of the Industrial Minerals & Aggregates Division, has previously served Chair of the Chicago Section of SME for six annual terms, and was formerly a SME Henry Krumb Lecturer. He was a Roy F. Shlemlon Distinguished Mentor for the Geologic Society of America and served as a Commissioner for the Washington Award Commission for the Western Society of Engineers. Gordie is currently a Senior Project Manager for Patrick Engineering Inc., and resides near Denver, Colorado with Lynne, his wife of over 38 years.

 

 

 



 
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